Find your happy place with acupuncture.




Don’t trust your health to just anyone. With over 9,000 individual acupuncture sessions performed since 2006, Qi Medicine acupuncture in Melbourne provides high quality care with compassionate, experienced female doctors. 

 

     

     

    What is acupuncture?

    Best acupuncture in Melbourne

    Acupuncture is an ancient medicine developed over 5,000 years ago in China and continues to be widely used to address a variety of health and wellness issues.

     

    Acupuncture is believed to work through balancing the body as a whole, not just focusing on one singular problem at a time. This balancing is achieved through activating meridians (energy pathways) throughout the body. If this concept seems a little foreign to you don’t worry, your body will naturally respond to the treatment even if your brain doesn’t fully understand it yet!

    The modern scientific explanation is that needling a point will stimulate the nervous system to release chemicals and hormones in the muscles, the spinal cord, and the brain. It is thought that this stimulation can change the experience of pain and trigger a natural healing response in the body tissues. Sessions can also have a calming effect, altering our state of mind to reduce stress and anxiety. 

     

    The registered Chinese medicine doctors at our Melbourne acupuncture clinic may be able to help you with any of the following issues:

     

    Acupuncture for depression, mood and anxiety 

    Current research has suggested acupuncture may be able to help alleviate the symptoms of mood disorders, including1:

    • Feeling stressed and under pressure
    • Feeling anxious, tense and worried
    • Needing help to overcome difficult stages in life
    • Depression (with anti-depressants)22
    • Sleeping issues and low energy12

     

     Acupuncture for pain relief

    There is ongoing research to suggest acupuncture may be able to help with symptomatic relief of:

     

    Acupuncture for general health

    Research also suggests that acupuncture may be able to assist you in a number of other areas including:

     

    There is also research supporting weak or unclear evidence that acupuncture may be useful in the following conditions, with more research needed.

    • Bells palsy24
    • Carpal tunnel syndrome25
    • Chronic fatigue syndrome 26
    • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)27
    • Chronic uriticaria28
    • Dysmenorrhea29
    • Induction of labour30
    • Primary ovarian insufficiency31
    • Psoriasis vulgaris32
    • Tinnitus33
    • Uterine fibroids34
    • Primary Sjogren’s syndrome35
    • Assisted conception in ART (Assisted reproductive technologies)36
    • Functional dyspepsia (reflux) 37

    Does acupuncture hurt?

    Our Chinese medicine practitioners specialise in taking first-time clients and will gently ease you through the whole process step by step. We promise you will feel as comfortable as possible throughout your treatment, as we conduct your private consultation and treatment.

     

    Your session is generally not painful as very fine needles are used to stimulate the points. Acupuncture can actually be quite relaxing as the body is given a chance to stop, relax and heal itself. Other sensations felt during treatment include a slight tingling in the body, which is actually quite a pleasant experience. 

     

    What can you expect in a treatment?

    Best acupuncture in melbourne

    Your session will consist of a consultation and treatment, along with dietary and lifestyle advice and supplements and herbs if needed. Your Chinese medicine practitioner will ask you several questions about your current and past state of health, to gain a deep understanding of what is causing imbalances in your health.

     

    Once your therapist has a whole picture of your health they can individualise a treatment to your specific needs. During your session, you will be able to fully relax in a private, comfortable room. The space at Qi Medicine is designed to let you fall into a deep state of relaxation, without interruption from the outside world. You will be encouraged to close your eyes and rest, allowing the treatment to promote healing in the body.

     

    You will often feel very relaxed after a session. It is best to drink plenty of water and do not undergo intense physical or mental activity for a few hours after your session, to let the internal healing continue after you leave the clinic.  

     

    In accordance with the registration standards of the CMBA (Chinese Medicine Registration Board Australia) all registered Chinese Medicine practitioners are obliged to meet standards of safety and efficacy. Qi Medicine prides itself on following strict safety guidelines, ensuring your session is as safe and effective as possible. 

     

    Acupuncture and Chinese medicine benefits

    • May provide ongoing symptomatic relief of some conditions without drugs
    • Promotes healing within your body without suppressing immunity
    • May be used by people of all ages
    • Does not result in ill side effects of some Western medications
    • Sessions can be relaxing and rejuvenating and can leave you feeling calm and happy
    • Rebates available in-house for private health insurance members

    Acupuncture does not replace all medical treatments available, and your current healthcare provider should be consulted before you discontinue any other forms of treatment. Acupuncture will often complement Western medical treatments through encouraging healing and recovery. 

     

    During your session you may be asked if you would like one of the following adjunct therapies to assist in your treatment:

    Chinese herbal medicine

    As a part of the Chinese medicine treatment, you may be prescribed a specific high-quality herbal formula to compliment your acupuncture treatment. All herbal medicines prescribed are in tablet form for convenience and adhere to the strict Australian therapeutic medicines guidelines.

     

    Cupping therapy

    Cupping can be an effective tool for reducing back, neck and shoulder pain (read more about cupping here). It is generally not very painful but may leave some marks on the skin. These marks generally fade within one week. Cupping can easily be included in your treatment for a deeper release of tight muscles and tendons.

     

    Moxa therapy

    Moxa (or moxibustion) is an important part of many Chinese medicine treatments. It is designed to warm up the skin and acupuncture channels for a specific therapeutic effect. Moxa is a dried herb or a charcoal-like substance, compressed into a stick or cone, and smoldered close to the skin. It is not intended to burn, only warm the area and often feels very pleasant.  

     

    Advice about acupuncture’s potential side effects and results

    On the whole, acupuncture is considered gentle, but like with any form of therapeutic intervention, there may be some unwanted side effects. These include:

     

    • Bruising and tenderness at the site of treatment 
    • Feeling tired after treatment
    • Some pain and redness at the insertion site 
    • Some swelling at the insertion point

    It is important to discuss your treatment options with your therapist first if you have any:

     

    • Bleeding disorders
    • Contagious blood diseases
    • Easy bruising
    • Metal allergies

    Acupuncture is not a miracle treatment and it is important to understand that like any form of therapeutic intervention results are never guaranteed. Please take the time to discuss your treatment options with your healthcare provider before undergoing treatment. It is common to need to undergo a series of sessions to achieve therapeutic benefit with acupuncture, so please be mindful of this when considering treatment. 

     

    Cost

    See our pricing page here

     

    Bookings

    Book online here or phone the clinic on (03) 8394 7665 to book your acupuncture treatment today.

     

    Are we easy to get to?

    Our acupuncture clinic is located in The Body and Brain Center, 356-362 Ascot Vale Rd, Moonee Ponds, in the North Western suburbs of Melbourne and close to Highpoint. Qi Medicine is minutes away from Ascot Vale, Avondale Heights, Maribyrnong, Brunswick West, Travancore, Flemington, Aberfeldie, Maidstone and Essendon, and just 10 km from Melbourne CBD. 

     

    By Sheena Vaughan. Follow Sheena on Google Plus and Facebook and stay up-to-date with all the latest news and deals with Qi Medicine.  

     

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      anxiety disorders using complementary and alternative medicine. Expert Rev Neurother. 2014 Apr;14(4):411-
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    2. Lam M, Galvin R, Curry P. Effectiveness of acupuncture for nonspecific chronic low back pain: a systematic
      review and meta-analysis. Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2013 Nov 15;38(24):2124-38.
    3. Lee JH, Choi TY, Lee MS, Lee H, Shin BC, Lee H. Acupuncture for acute low back pain: a systematic review. Clin J
      Pain. 2013 Feb;29(2):172-85.
    4. Lewis RA, Williams NH, Sutton AJ, Burton K, Din NU, Matar HE, et al. Comparative clinical effectiveness of
      management strategies for sciatica: systematic review and network meta-analyses. Spine J. 2015 Jun
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    5.  McDonald J, Janz S. The Acupuncture Evidence Project: A Comparative Literature Review (Revised Edition). Brisbane: Australian Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine Association Ltd; 2017. http://www.acupuncture.org.au.
    6. Dong W, Goost H, Lin XB, Burger C, Paul C, Wang ZL, et al. Treatments for shoulder impingement syndrome: a
      PRISMA systematic review and network meta-analysis. Medicine (Baltimore). 2015 Mar;94(10):e510.
    7. Lee SH, Lim SM. Acupuncture for Poststroke Shoulder Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Evid Based
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    8. Yang Y, Que Q, Ye X, Zheng G. Verum versus sham manual acupuncture for migraine: a systematic review of
      randomised controlled trials. Acupunct Med. 2016 Apr;34(2):76-83.
    9. Coeytaux RR, Befus D. Role of Acupuncture in the Treatment or Prevention of Migraine, Tension-Type
      Headache, or Chronic Headache Disorders. Headache. 2016 Jul;56(7):1238-40.
    10. Corbett MS, Rice SJ, Madurasinghe V, Slack R, Fayter DA, Harden M, et al. Acupuncture and other physical
      treatments for the relief of pain due to osteoarthritis of the knee: network meta-analysis. Osteoarthritis
      Cartilage. 2013 Sep;21(9):1290-8.
    11. MacPherson H, Tilbrook H, Agbedjro D, Buckley H, Hewitt C, Frost C. Acupuncture for irritable bowel
      syndrome: 2-year follow-up of a randomised controlled trial. Acupunct Med. 2016 Mar 15.
    12. Lee SH, Lim SM. Acupuncture for insomnia after stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC
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    13.  Ma C, Sivamani RK. Acupuncture as a Treatment Modality in Dermatology: A Systematic Review. J Altern
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    14. Feng S, Han M, Fan Y, Yang G, Liao Z, Liao W, et al. Acupuncture for the treatment of allergic rhinitis: a
      systematic review and meta-analysis. Am J Rhinol Allergy. 2015 Jan-Feb;29(1):57-62.
    15. Jang SH, Kim DI, Choi MS. Effects and treatment methods of acupuncture and herbal medicine for
      premenstrual syndrome/premenstrual dysphoric disorder: systematic review. BMC Complement Altern Med.
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    16. Effects of acupuncture for the treatment of endometriosis-related pain: A systematic review and meta-analysis: Yang Xu, Wenli Zhao, Te Li , Ye Zhao , Huaien, Shilin Song
    17. Qian Y, Xia XR, Ochin H, Huang C, Gao C, Gao L, et al. Therapeutic effect of acupuncture on the outcomes of in
      vitro fertilization: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2016 Dec 19.
    18. Liddle SD, Pennick V. Interventions for preventing and treating low-back and pelvic pain during pregnancy.
      Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015(9):Cd001139.
    19. Identifying Chinese herbal medicine network for treating acne: Implications from a nationwide database.
      Chen HY1, Lin YH1, Chen YC2.J Ethnopharmacol. 2016 Feb 17;179:1-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2015.12.032. Epub 2015 Dec 22.
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    21. Chiu HY, Pan CH, Shyu YK, Han BC, Tsai PS. Effects of acupuncture on menopause-related symptoms and
      quality of life in women in natural menopause: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Menopause.
      2015 Feb;22(2):234-44.
    22. Chan YY, Lo WY, Yang SN, Chen YH, Lin JG. The benefit of combined acupuncture and antidepressant
      medication for depression: A systematic review and meta-analysis. J Affect Disord. 2015 May 1;176:106-17.
    23. Zhang YN, Zhao HJ, Wang Y, Lu Y, Wang SJ. [Effect of Electroacupuncture Intervention on Constipation predominant Irritable Bowl Syndrome and Colonic CGRP and SP Expression in Rats]. Zhen Ci Yan Jiu. 2016
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    24. Li P, Qiu T, Qin C. Efficacy of Acupuncture for Bell’s Palsy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of
      Randomized Controlled Trials. PLOS ONE. 2015;10(5):e0121880.
    25. Hadianfard M, Bazrafshan E, Momeninejad H, Jahani N. Efficacies of Acupuncture and Anti-inflammatory
      Treatment for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. J Acupunct Meridian Stud. 2015 Oct;8(5):229-35.
    26. Kim JE, Seo BK, Choi JB, Kim HJ, Kim TH, Lee MH, et al. Acupuncture for chronic fatigue syndrome and
      idiopathic chronic fatigue: a multicenter, nonblinded, randomized controlled trial. Trials. 2015;16:314.
    27. Coyle ME, Shergis JL, Huang ET, Guo X, Di YM, Zhang A, et al. Acupuncture therapies for chronic obstructive
      pulmonary disease: a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials. Altern Ther Health Med. 2014 NovDec;20(6):10-23.
    28. Yao Q, Li S, Liu X, Qin Z, Liu Z. The Effectiveness and Safety of Acupuncture for Patients with Chronic Urticaria:
      A Systematic Review. Biomed Res Int. 2016;2016:5191729.
    29. Smith CA, Armour M, Zhu X, Li X, Lu ZY, Song J. Acupuncture for dysmenorrhoea. Cochrane Database Syst Rev.
      2016;4:Cd007854
    30. Smith CA, Crowther CA, Grant SJ. Acupuncture for induction of labour. Cochrane Database Syst Rev.
      2013(8):Cd002962.
    31. Jo J, Lee YJ, Lee H. Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Primary Ovarian Insufficiency: A Systematic Review and
      Meta-Analysis. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2015;2015:842180.
    32. Coyle M, Deng J, Zhang AL, Yu J, Guo X, Xue CC, et al. Acupuncture therapies for psoriasis vulgaris: a systematic
      review of randomized controlled trials. Forsch Komplementmed. 2015;22(2):102-9.
    33. He M, Li X, Liu Y, Zhong J, Jiang L, Liu Y, et al. Electroacupuncture for Tinnitus: A Systematic Review. PLOS ONE.
      2016;11(3):e0150600.
    34. Dalton-Brewer N. The Role of Complementary and Alternative Medicine for the Management of Fibroids and
      Associated Symptomatology. Curr Obstet Gynecol Rep. 2016;5:110-8.
    35. Hackett KL, Deane KH, Strassheim V, Deary V, Rapley T, Newton JL, et al. A systematic review of nonpharmacological interventions for primary Sjogren’s syndrome. Rheumatology (Oxford). 2015 Nov;54(11):2025-32.
    36. Qian Y, Xia XR, Ochin H, Huang C, Gao C, Gao L, et al. Therapeutic effect of acupuncture on the outcomes of in
      vitro fertilization: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2016 Dec 19.
    37. Kim KN, Chung SY, Cho SH. Efficacy of acupuncture treatment for functional dyspepsia: A systematic review
      and meta-analysis. Complement Ther Med. 2015 Dec;23(6):759-66.
    38. Zhao XF, Hu HT, Li JS, Shang HC, Zheng HZ, Niu JF, et al. Is Acupuncture Effective for Hypertension? A
      Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. PLOS ONE. 2015;10(7):e0127019.

     

    Summary
    Acupuncture Melbourne
    Service Type
    Acupuncture Melbourne
    Provider Name
    Qi Medicine acupuncture Melbourne,
    356-362 Ascot Vale Rd,Moonee Ponds,Melbourne-3020,
    Telephone No.(03) 8394 7665
    Area
    Melbourne
    Description
    Let the experienced practitioners of Chinese medicine at Qi Medicine Melbourne help you with a range of issues from back and neck pain, sciatica, female health, pregnancy-related issues, digestive problems stress and anxiety, sleeping problems, to name a few. The practitioners at our Melbourne acupuncture clinic are highly trained, experienced and compassionate, and are ready to help you achieve optimum health and wellness. Private health rebates available.

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    (03) 8394 7665


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